Esperanto Book Archive on Áya Dan

Raye Chell Mahela

homo kaj kosmo - esperanto revuo 2

japanaj_fabeloj_00

A while ago, a bunch of old Esperanto books and magazines were donated to our local Esperanto group (Esperanto Kansas City).

These books go back as far as the 1930s, and right now they just sit in my apartment. I would like to archive them, so I will try to scan some of them over time.

You can view the first two entries on the Esperanto Book Archive page.

Anyone want to help me parse text files?

Raye Chell Mahela


 

I think that it would be nice to build a dictionary that has translations between many conlangs and natlangs, for use as a single application.

And, let me know if this has already been done, because I don’t want to reinvent the wheel or anything.

I’ve set up a GitHub project here:
https://github.com/RachelJMorris/Conlang-Dictionary
in hopes that I can get some help with this casual project.

Mainly, I’ve pulled dictionaries from around the ‘web, and they need to be parsed. Most of these dictionaries aren’t made with the idea of parsability in mind, only being read by a human. Scraping data from documents like these is always a pain, and I wouldn’t want to do it all solo.

Additionally, it’s always good to have another set of eyes looking over the design so that features that might be really important are added ahead of time, or a bad design is pointed out. I haven’t designed any databases in a while, but I’m hoping what I have makes some sense.

Finfine, after a dictionary has been compiled and made available to everybody as an CopyFree asset, it would be nice to also build some CopyFree dictionary utilities – for web, desktop, and mobile.

Thoughts?

The Cat’s Meal – Anadal Ruloth

Raye Chell Mahela

 

The cat was hungry. Bíide eril yide rul wo.
The cat went to the sea. Eril sháad rul meladi.
The cat found a fish. Eril redeb rul thilith.
The fish said in fear, “Don’t eat me!” Eril di thili, “Bóoya yod ra ne leth!
The cat agreed. Eril zhedi rul.
The cat went to the park. Eril sháad rul heshehothedi.
The cat found a bird. Eril redeb rul babíth.
The bird said in fear, “Don’t eat me!” Eril di babí, “Bóoya yod ra ne leth!”
The cat agreed. Eril zhedi rul.
The cat went to the grocery store. Eril sháad rul anawehedi.
The cat bought a cake from the store. Eril eb rul thuzheth anawehede.
The cat ate the cake. Eril yod rul thuzheth.

Láadan Helper – Offline dictionary and reference

Raye Chell Mahela

I’ve created a Láadan app for Google Play called “Láadan Helper”. It contains:

  • An offline dictionary (no web access needed)
  • Bookshelf (stuff to read)
  • Phrase book
  • Word list
  • Grammar Reference
  • Link to Áyadan, the Láadan WikiBook, and LaadanLanguage.org

I will add lessons later as I expand the lessons section on the WikiBook. Many of these pages simply embed the WikiBook pages for now, since everything will probably change as it is being worked on. In the future, I can make this a totally online version, but with all the potential changes, I’d prefer to only update one location right now.

The dictionary is built into the phone, though. It is pretty simple and will be enhanced later on, but it is good for looking up specific words.


Download it on Google Play for free

Get it on Google Play

Láadan Quick Search Dictionary

Raye Chell Mahela

web dict

I’ve built a new quick-search dictionary for the Láadan language, and it is available through the Láadan page of this site.

It displays all the entries from the LaadanLanguage.org Láadan-to-English dictionary, and then you can enter a search term to filter the list. Any entries where your term shows up will be visible.

You can access it here:
http://ayadan.moosader.com/gadgets/laadan-dictionary/

Or get the source code here:
https://github.com/Ayadan-Laadan/Laadan-Dictionary

The Láadan Classroom – Set 1

Raye Chell Mahela

I created five videos about Láadan last weekend – three lessons, a review, and an extra one on name translation/transliteration. :)

Please check them out! If you post up a video on YouTube to your own work in Láadan (vlog, song, practicing, short story, etc.) then I will link to it in a future lesson video!

Lesson 1: Basic Sentences

Lesson 2: Tenses, Yes/No Questions, and Pronouns

Lesson 3: Conjugations and Objects

Extra – Translating your name into Láadan

Review – Lessons 1 through 3


Know any interesting Láadan links? You should post it on the /r/Laadan subreddit!

With, Withid, e bebáa? – Woman, man, or what?

Raye Chell Mahela

Láadan’s ability to describe gender is difficult.


 

My quest for animation software continues. Linux-based software is sorely lacking in this regard. Sure, there’s software like Synfig, but it lacks features that even my 1999 Flash editor has. 😐

Gender in Volapük

Yesterday I was surprised to see that there was a Volapük tag, so I thought I would take the opportunity today to write about the language.

Volapük was constructed by Johann Martin Schleyer, a German Roman Catholic priest, in the late 1800s, after he claimed to have had a vision from God. It was the original international auxiliary language movement; the third international Volapük convention took place entirely in Volapük, which was the first time (that I’m aware of) when a constructed language was brought out of theory and into practice. The second was probably Esperanto.

Volapük eventually died as a result of infighting between the Academy and Schleyer (the Cifal or Chief) over control of the language. This same story has often been repeated in the communities of various constructed languages, such as Loglan for example. The Academy went on to make Idiom Neutral, which was very heavily influenced by Volapük, but the movement never recovered. Today there are a handful of people who still speak it, and a significantly larger number of people who study it. Personally, I am not fluent in Volapük, but I do study it, and if I ever had the time, I think it would be fun to become fluent.

Volapük, as spoken today, has three third-person pronouns: on, om, and of. On is an all-purpose pronoun, usable for both people and things. A group of men would be caled oms as a pronoun, a group of women would be called ofs, and a mixed group would be called ons. It is also possible to simply refer to everyone as on and ons. This system is the result of the grammatical reform of Arie de Jong, which happened decades after the original Volapük movement had mostly died out. Under the old system, men and things would go by om in the singular, oms in the plural. Women would go by of in the singular, ofs in the plural.

Volapük is a pro-drop language, meaning you ordinarily don’t use pronouns in the nominative except for emphasis. But the personal suffixes of verbs are exactly the same as the pronouns:

binom: He is
binof: She is
binon: It is; They (sing) are
binons: They are
binoms: They (masc) are
binofs: They (fem) are

Informally and regardless of whatever the official policy might be, genderqueer people could certainly add pronouns to Volapük the same way they do in Esperanto with e.g. “ri”. The following letters are currently used for Volapük pronouns: b, d, f, k, l, m, n, r, s, y. This leaves the following letters left over: g, p, t, v. There are other letters in the Volapük alphabet (c, h, j, x, z), but it would be hard to pluralize them in pronouns, since plurals are formed with s. The pronoun os is impersonal, and has no plural form. Yet it might still be feasible if you wanted your personal pronoun to be (for example) “oz”, and for the plural of it to simply be “ons.”

Of course, you would be likely to find the same difficulties using non-standard pronouns in Volapük that you did anywhere else.

There are also two Volapük gender prefixes, hi- and ji-, which make a noun masculine or feminine, respectively. So the Volapük word for “human” is men (derived from German Mensch), and if you wanted to say “man” you could either say himen, or you could synonymously say man. For “woman” you could say jimen or, synonymously, vom. There is no prefix that makes something non-binary, but as with pronouns, I’m sure someone could find a way if they wanted to :)

I find it interesting that Volapük uses “on” to represent both people and things. There are Esperanto speakers who claim that this function is fulfilled by ĝi in Esperanto, but unlike in Volapük, this has never been common or established usage except in reference to animals and babies.

I personally love Volapük; it’s a fun language with its own character, and it gets a very bad name in the Esperanto community. It’s easier to understand than it seems, once you get used to its alphabet and weird ways of assimilating words. Most of the words are derived from natural sources, and are more phonologically faithful than orthographically. This means that spoken aloud, some of them even sound more like their original root words than Esperanto words do.

Also, because Volapük has religious roots, I find the idea of talking about irreligious (or even sacrilegious) things in the language amusing :)

You can learn more about Volapük at volapük.com.

An Experiment in Conlang Gender Diversity

I set out in November to write a constructed language that celebrated gender diversity. Many conlangs skirt the issue of gender through the use of a single third-person pronoun, as is also seen in many natural languages. I wanted to do something a bit different.

Part of my inspiration for this was, in fact, Suzette Haden Elgin, who constructed Láadan out of a belief that women were “not superior to men (Matriarchy) or interchangeable with and equal to men (Androgyny) but rather entirely different from men.” I felt similarly about gender in conlangs: it is very easy to make everyone the same, but it misses the point of gender diversity.

Just as Elgin created a series of books about the construction of Láadan, I ended up creating a culture of people who spoke the language, a world they lived in, and various other cultures who lived alongside them. It’s still in progress, and the language is still “evolving” (being developed by me) in many ways. Some of the things that were true about the language at the beginning of December have been changed since then.

The contest Lexember was very helpful to me in developing it, although the gender system has been there from the very beginning and has barely changed aside from a few tweaks. You can read about the gender system on my conlanging Tumblr.

It has occurred to me, though, that the gender system of this fictional culture is still centered around the concept that binary gender is the norm (I wish I knew the word for this). You are either male, female, or “miscellaneous.” So as I keep developing this culture and its world, I will have to think of ways to break out of this in future cultures, worlds, langs, etc. This experiment will, hopefully, inspire better ones, either in me or in someone else.