The Lord’s Prayer in multiple conlangs

Raye Chell Mahela

I don’t know why exactly this shows up as a sample translation for many languages (tradition from classic translation practices?), but it is. So let’s show the prayer in multiple conlangs, shall we?

See also, the Reddit thread in /r/Conlangs,
What is the Lord’s Prayer in your conlang?


English

Our Father in heaven,
hallowed be your name.
Your kingdom come,
your will be done,
on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
and forgive us our debts,
as we also have forgiven our debtors.
And lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.

Esperanto

Patro nia, kiu estas en la ĉielo,
Via nomo estu sanktigita.
Venu Via regno,
plenumiĝu Via volo,
kiel en la ĉielo, tiel ankaŭ sur la tero.
Nian panon ĉiutagan donu al ni hodiaŭ.
Kaj pardonu al ni niajn ŝuldojn,
kiel ankaŭ ni pardonas al niaj ŝuldantoj.
Kaj ne konduku nin en tenton,
sed liberigu nin de la malbono.

Wikipedia, Comparison between Esperanto and Ido

Ido

Patro nia, qua esas en la cielo,
tua nomo santigesez;
tua regno advenez;
tua volo facesez
quale en la cielo, tale anke sur la tero.
Donez a ni cadie l’omnadiala pano,
e pardonez a ni nia ofensi,
quale anke ni pardonas a nia ofensanti,
e ne duktez ni aden la tento,
ma liberigez ni del malajo.

Wikipedia, Comparison between Esperanto and Ido

Interlingua

Patre nostre, qui es in le celos,
que tu nomine sia sanctificate;
que tu regno veni;
que tu voluntate sia facite
como in le celo, etiam super le terra.

Da nos hodie nostre pan quotidian,
e pardona a nos nostre debitas
como etiam nos los pardona a nostre debitores.
E non induce nos in tentation,
sed libera nos del mal.
Amen.

Wikipedia, Interlingua

Lojban

doi cevrirni .iu noi zvati le do cevzda do’u
fu’e .aicai .e’ecai lo do cmene ru’i censa
.i le do nobli turni be la ter. ku se cfari
.i loi do se djica ba snada mulno vi’e le cevzda .e .a’o la ter.
(.i do nobli turni vi’e le cevzda .ebazake .a’o la ter.)
(.i loi do se djica ba snada mulno vi’e le cevzda .e .a’o la ter.)
.i fu’e .e’o ko dunda ca le cabdei le ri nanba mi’a
.i ko fraxu mi loi ri zu’o palci
.ijo mi fraxu roda poi pacyzu’e xrani mi
.i ko lidne mi fa’anai loi pacyxlu
.i ko sepri’a mi loi palci
(.i .uicai ni’ike loi se turni .e loi vlipa .e loi mi’orselsi’a me le do romei)

Lojban.org

Láadan

Bi’ili,
Thul lenetha Na olimeha.
Wil he’eda zha Natha.
Wil nosha’ad sha Natha lenedi.
Wil sho’o yoth Natha,
Doniha zhe olimeha;
Wil ban Na bal lenethoth lenedi
I wil baneban Na lud lenethoth lenedi
Zhe mebane len luda’ lenethoth lenedi
I wil un ra Na lelneth erabal hedi
Izh wil bo’odan Na leneth rami’ilade
Bro’o sha, sha Natha
I hohathad, hohama Natha
I hohama, hohama Natha
Ril i aril i irilrili
Othe.

From A First Dictionary and Grammar of Láadan, Second Edition, by Suzette Haden Elgin

Toki Pona

Translation by Pijie/Jopi

mama pi mi mute o, sina lon sewi kon.
nimi sina li sewi.
ma sina o kama.
jan o pali e wile sina lon sewi kon en lon ma.
o pana e moku pi tenpo suno ni tawa mi mute.
o weka e pali ike mi. sama la mi weka e pali ike pi jan ante.
o lawa ala e mi tawa ike.
o lawa e mi tan ike.
tenpo ali la sina jo e ma e wawa e pona.
Amen.

Wikipedia, Toki Pona

Volapük

1930 de Jong Volapük

O Fat obas, kel binol in süls!
Nem olik pasalüdükonöd!
Regän ola kömonöd!
Vil olik jenonöd, äsä in sül, i su tal!
Givolös obes adelo bodi aldelik obsik!
E pardolös obes döbotis obsik,
äsä i obs pardobs utanes, kels edöbons kol obs.
E no blufodolös obis,
ab livükolös obis de bad!
(Ibä dutons lü ol regän, e nämäd e glor jü ün laidüp.)
So binosös!

Wikipedia, Volapük

Why learn Ido? – Vicente Thiên Nguyễn

Raye Chell Mahela

I started learning Ido because of these reasons:

  1. Simply because I am interested in conlangs.

  2. Ido is relatively easy. I’m not sure if it’s easier than Esperanto or not; but it wouldn’t cause much trouble even for monolinguals.

  3. In order to be able to discuss about Ido, I started learning it. I myself saw posts and comments of Esperantists with negative attitude towards Ido. I know this is not a general attitude of Esperantists, but I was upset then, honestly.

  4. The proposals and improvements actually work beautifully. I’m not judging whether Ido or Esperanto is better, though.

  5. Ido speakers are very nice, in my opinion.

  6. I like the flag of Ido. I think the flag of Esperanto is beautiful too; but here’s my personal story: Many of my friends hate Esperanto “at first glance” because of the flag. However, they have a very neutral attitude towards the flag of Ido. (they are not interested in conlangs, by the way.) Those are very personal reasons for learning Ido. But I would like to add one last reason:

  7. Learning Ido has brought me joy and excitement. It’s definitely worth my time and effort. I hope anyone will have the same experience! Warmest greetings to all those who are interested in learning Ido!

— Vicente Thiên Nguyễn

View more reasons for “Why learn Ido?”

Why learn Ido? – João Xavier Santos

Raye Chell Mahela

I’ve started learning Ido after discovering the Wikipedia in Ido language – https://io.wikipedia.org – and also the Wiktionary in Ido – https://io.wiktionary.org . The reasons were a sum of three factors:

– First, I’ve seen that the language has a simple grammar; it’s vocabulary is not too much difficult to understand (many people who speak or know English, Spanish and/or French recognizes the meaning of many of its words); it is written with no special diacriticals (Esperanto, for example, uses the circumflex signal ^ over certain letters, such as c and j to represent other sounds, but keyboards in general do not permit writing a circumflex over consonants). So, a language easy to learn, read, and write.

– Second, I’m an amateur programmer, who developed simple programs which allowed me to write simple tables of contents in order to place them in Wikipedian articles. And I’ve developed “macros” in Word and OpenOffice Basic which can find and replace words or expressions wrongly written by the correct forms, rapidly and automatically (of course the “macro” functions if the mispell is the same each time the word appears in the text, or in many texts). So, I could develop skills on programming and learn Ido language altogether.

– Third, I also like Human Sciences, specially History (including some biographies) and Geography, and I like to translate materials between the languages that I know: Portuguese (my native language), English, Spanish, and… Ido. I like to read, for example, about the geographical features of a country and then translate those informations to another language (of course, if the original text is reasonably good). So, I practice Ido language and, at the same time, I study geography and exercise the abillities of gathering the ideas in order to write a text that must be clearly comprehensible.

Three factors altogether.

And why not trying to learn other constructed languages at the same time? Because there would be a risk for me to mix the grammars and vocabularies and miswrite the texts. To avoid this I prefer to learn and use languages one at a time.

— João Xavier Santos

View more reasons for “Why learn Ido?”

Why learn Ido? – Ciencisto

Raye Chell Mahela

I am a native French speaker. I started learning English at the age of 10, Spanish about three years later and some Swedish a few years ago. I am now 17.

I like learning languages and using them with people of other cultures and nationalities. In fact, I originally wanted to learn Esperanto as a hobby and also as a support for Zamenhof’s dream of a global second language. Therefore, I read a few Esperanto samples and listened to others on YouTube. However, I ended up really, really disliking the use of -j and -n everywhere; it felt very unnatural and ugly to me, and that affected my perception of the whole language. I also found out that Esperanto was spoiled with flaws reminiscent of Zamenhof’s cultural and historical background, such as default masculine, diacritics and the suspicious use of the mal- root.

Consequently, I dug a little deeper in the information about constructed languages, and I found out that Esperanto was not the only popular project. I compared texts written in Esperanto, Ido, Interlingua, Novial, et al., and that is when I fell in love with Ido. Not only did it seem simple and elegant, but it also seemed to me like the ideal Italian stereotype I had — and have — in mind. I always wanted to learn Italian, so for me it was a compelling — albeit obviously wrong — detail.

Yet as I actually learned the language and met the online community, Ido grew on me. It is certainly not perfect, but I can feel that it is well made and the contemporary community is really nice. It may not have thousands of speakers — and may not be Italian — but meeting one single interesting person and having constructive and captivating discussions with that one single person is enough for me. It would have taken me years of experience to have such discussions in Italian. After less than a year of learning, you can have one in Ido.

Ciencisto

View more reasons for “Why learn Ido?”

Why learn Ido? – Marcus Trawick

Raye Chell Mahela

I learn Ido because I love it’s precision compared to Esperanto. I also love it’s euphony. I first learned Esperanto when I was young in the 70’s. I became fluent in it several years ago and became familiar with certain aspects of Esperanto that seem to be either less of a problem or non-existent in Ido I believe that Esperanto and Ido both will surge in popularity one day as more people around the globe develop a sense of lingual fairness and get away from the notion that the world’s lingua franca must be a national language. Ido rides on the coat-tails of Esperanto’s successs. Ido will always be there as a more refined, more precise and ( according to taste) more euphonious alternative.

Marcus Trawick

View more reasons for “Why learn Ido?”

Why learn Ido? – ComradeBecca

Raye Chell Mahela

I think I started learning it when I was mad about an argument I had gotten in or maybe just read with some homophobes in Esperanto. I have realized since then that conflicts are part of life, and Esperanto continues to be way more of a passion for me than Ido, but I continue learning Ido because if I have a skill, however useless, it’s worth retaining it.

— ComradeBecca

View more reasons for “Why learn Ido?”

La Ido Linguo and Sharing it with Others

Raye Chell Mahela

quoesasito

Esperanto has a problem with branding. Can Ido be a blank slate for introducing others to Auxiliary languages?

Most people who have already heard of Esperanto, regard it with disdain, for some reason. I think part of the problem is that they see it as egotistical for one man to invent a language. Some people are a bit more familiar with Esperanto than just the ‘synopsis’, and their dislike of Esperanto comes from run-ins with Esperantistoj, who come off as pushy and defensive. (This, I think, is mainly because there’s a few myths about Esperanto that everybody brings up, and we’re tired of hearing it, so we get exasperated. Nobody listens to us! :P)

So, Esperanto has a branding problem. However, Ido does not. This is partially because almost nobody knows what Ido is.

Ido is more of a tabula rasa at this point. Yes, there are few speakers of Ido, and nobody knows what it is, but that can make it a building point.

I also think that telling people what Ido is would go over a bit better – Oh, a committee of people put together this language! Somehow sounds more scientific and thought-out than just some random man.

You still have the problem of the over-European influences on the language, even more so than Esperanto it seems like, but since nobody knows Ido to begin with, it’s about “marketing” that as a strength. Perhaps not jumping right into the “Fina Venko”, “This is a global second language for everybody” pitch. (Does Ido even have a “Fina Venko”? I’m not that close to Ido culture).

You also have the advantage of Ilu Elu Olu. People new to Ido won’t find the same fighting going on over the Esperanto -iĉ, gender neutrality, and so on. Some people, who would otherwise be interested in learning Esperanto, can run into this early on and leave – not because it’s being discussed, but because of the hate that gets spewed when it is discussed. Alienating people who voluntarily come to the language is not the way to spread your language!

I, myself, kabeis (left the Esperanto world) several times, but eventually came back because it was fundamentally a fun thing for me. I just learned which communities to avoid. ;P

Minor pluses include lack of hats – strange and different, hard-to-type (relatively) characters are intimidating! And perhaps lack of accusative – though, really kids, the accusative isn’t a difficult concept to grasp. I had trouble with it at first, too, but it’s really not difficult. ;P

So what do you think?  If you’re an Esperantist, do you think that Ido is worth a shot? (I mean, you already know Esperanto, how much more work would it be to learn Ido?)

Would it be worth it to be a part of and build the Ido community?

My Ido website is here: http://niaido.moosader.com/

And if you’d like to be part of a chatroom, there is #NiaIdo on Freenode. You can connect via the web through this link.


Some input from my friend Tea (with formatting/grammatical fixes):

As a long time Ido learner, I think that Ido has both a disadvantage and an advantage. That is: It is not well-known.

How’s that good?

Well, Esperanto community is already as big as it is but it’s also very crystallized. It is not flexible at all. Now, Ido is a very beautiful language and it fixes and improves a lot of Esperanto flaws (Call it flaws, call it features) although that depends on your taste. Ido has a chance of not learning of the mistakes of the past and to grow up and mature (both physically and actually the community feels very cozy because is not as big as Esperanto’s).

I always saw Esperanto and Ido as two languages that can live together, that could even merge into one or even many languages (which would be really cool). Maybe they are not as close as dialects but they are two really close languages one to the other.

I saw other communities of not-known-languages that are really cool they are so flexible, so collaborative, they care about newcomers and about making the language grow and not bashing people for “not using it properly” and to see people speaking different languages, understanding each other and going towards the same goal is simply marvellous.

Because what I hate the most is to be new at something and have a bunch of smart-asses bashing me instead of helping me.