Áya Dan YouTube channel

Raye Chell Mahela

Screenshot of Áya Dan channel on YouTubeClick here to visit the channel

A bit ago, I set up the Áya Dan YouTube channel, though due to lack of time, did not upload any videos to it. Last night, I migrated my videos from my Esperanto, Ido, and Láadan YouTube channels over here, so there is at least some content now!

Goals

The goal of the YouTube channel is the same as the blog:

  • First, to be a collaborative space for people to post about, or in, conlangs.
  • Secondly, Áya Dan is meant to also give a platform to amplify peoples’ voices, especially when it comes to social issues. One of the original blogs that was merged into Áya Dan was “La Aliuloj”, which was started as a LGBTQIA+ Esperanto blog.
  • Third, to build original content around conlangs – not just translations of existing works (though translations and reworkings are somewhat allowed). We want to encourage the creation of unique content from people with various viewpoints and backgrounds.

And, all conlangs are welcome!

Contributing

Sometimes people send me little news updates and I will post about that, or if someone would like to contribute a one-off blog post or video, we can upload those for you. If you would like to be a regular contributor, and have access to the channel/blog to upload content whenever you have free time, please email me at Rachel@Moosader.com !

 

 

Translation of Pepper & Carrot into Ido

Raye Chell Mahela

preview

A few days ago, Giles-Philippe Morin reached out to me to let me know that he and William Johnsson has translated the libre/open-source comic, Pepper & Carrot, to Ido.

(It is also available in Lojban and Esperanto)

It is viewable here:
http://www.peppercarrot.com/io/article234/potion-of-flight

Actually this seems like a pretty cool idea! Like a Wiki page, but for comics. I would definitely like to see more of this sort of thing.

SEXUO E GENRO EN IDO: HISTORIALA PERSPEKTIVO E MODERNA TENDENCI

Raye Chell Mahela

This article was sent to me by Idist Brian Drake who reached out to me about their work in the language, and also pointed out this article to me, from La blua plumo:

SEXUO E GENRO EN IDO: HISTORIALA PERSPEKTIVO E MODERNA TENDENCI 

It not only has a non-gender-specific way of talking about people […], but we’re even working on a trans-appropriate affix and pronoun. I think that’s pretty great.

I’m not a very quick Ido reader, but if somebody would like to provide an English-language summary for me, I will add it to this blog post for more people to learn about! :)

Thanks!

RPG Maker and Conlangs

Raye Chell Mahela

Sometimes, I’ll open up RPG Maker (one of the many iterations of ’em) and make myself an RPG, in some random conlang. Because let’s face it, there are pretty much no games in most conlangs.

These are mostly nonsensical, but maybe here to inspire someone reading to go pick up RPG Maker, or another game making tool – Game Maker, RenPy, or heck, even C++, and make some games. (Preferably with translations. 😉

These also may contain poor grammar, since I made ’em while learning. Plz forgive. :B


 

Esperanto

RPG Maker VX (PC) game – Trezoro de la Drako (2014)

RPG Maker 2 (PS2) game – La Hundo Perdita (2014)


 

Ido

RPG Maker VX (PC) game – La Drako de la Turmo (2014)


 

Láadan

RPG Maker 2003 (PC) game – Óowamid (2015)


 

Why learn Ido? – Sanzo84

Raye Chell Mahela

A late reply (by 4 months), so apologies in advance. I’m a native Indonesian speaker, but I learned English since I was around 3 and currently teaching English as a Second Language to teenagers and adults. I’m also proficient in French (B2 level) having lived in France for 6 years. When I visited my parents for the summer in Romania for around 4-5 months, I picked up the language quickly because it was also a Romance language. I was able to get around in broken Romanian after 2-3 months. I also picked up bits and pieces of other languages just for kicks: Japanese, German, Spanish, Russian, Dutch, even Irish Gaelic. None of which I studied seriously (that is, I never took formal language courses in these languages).

I’m learning Ido because I wanted to learn an International Auxiliary Language (IAL) out of curiosity. Like many others, I looked at Esperanto first but was turned off by the diacritics in the language. I learned them in French and Romanian, but sought a more simpler IAL. I was interested in Ido when I learned that it was based on early reforms in Esperanto. I took a look at Ido and was immediately hooked. I’ve been studying for less than a week, but I’m reading free PDFs of Progreso and Kuriero Internaciona as well as other books in Ido with little difficulty. It may be because of my grasp in two Romance languages, but I was thrilled to find out I could understand around 40% of text in Ido already!

I’m hoping to seriously learn this simple yet beautiful IAL and help spread the word here in Indonesia. I even started to text “Me amoras tu” to my girlfriend, hoping to convince her to study along with me.

— Sanzo84

View more reasons for “Why learn Ido?”

The Good Fairy: An Esperanto Fairy Tale of Respectability Politics

In the Summer of 2015 I had the opportunity to read “La bona feino” (The Good Fairy), a fairy tale written in Esperanto by a white, heterosexual European male librarian named Louis Beaucaire. Although Beaucaire wrote a number of these Fairy Tales of the Green Magpie, he was best known for Kruko kaj Baniko el Bervalo (Kruko and Baniko from Bervalo), a set of “indecent anecdotes” about a couple of womanizing, brothel-frequenting, married straight men living in a fictional land called Bervalo.

But let’s forget Kruko and Baniko and move onto “The Good Fairy.” Paraphrased, it goes like this: a fairy learns about Esperanto and wants to learn it due to its pretensions of being able to bring about world peace. When she begins to actually study the matter, she finds out that inside the language’s foundational text, the Fundamento de Esperanto, there is a story about an evil fairy, and she does not like it. She thinks it is insulting to fairies. So she writes to L. L. Zamenhof, who assures her that he had no intention of offending fairies, and would be happy to remove it, only he cannot because it is already part of the language’s foundational text. Reassured, the Good Fairy goes on to become a completely self-sacrificing, party-line-toeing Esperantist, including at one point using her magic to oppose the Ido movement. She never again questions the language, Zamenhof or the Fundamento.

This story is a frequently anthologized part of Esperanto literature, and it demonstrates the inherent respectability politics of the language. If you want to be a “good fairy,” you must not only accept being marginalized within the foundational text of Esperanto, but you must oppose the “bad fairies” who do not accept it. If the Ido movement, for example, wants equality for fairies at the expense of the Esperanto movement’s doctrine (the Fundamento), they are evil people whom good fairies must oppose at all costs. And if fairies don’t oppose Ido and support Esperanto, they are bad fairies.

That’s what the white, cisgender Western Esperantist Louis Beaucaire wanted to convey. That’s what the Nobel-prize-nominated Esperanto poet William Auld loved enough to include in the anthology Nova Esperanta Krestomatio during the 1980s, and what the Universal Esperanto Association continues to publish. You be the judge.